Tag Archives: audit reslience

DGIQ 2018

12 Jul

The DGIQ conference this year went well. I had two presentations, caught up with industry colleagues and customers. It helped that it was in San Diego – and the weather relative to the hot mugginess of the Mid Atlantic was excellent.

My presentation on GDPR was surprisingly well attended. I say surprising in that the deadline has passed, and I find that there are still companies that are formulating their  plans. However, I am beginning to feel a bit like Samuel Jackson.

IMG_2650

In the GDPR presentation, the goal was to focus attention on not only doing the right thing to be compliant, but also doing it right. How do we reduce the stress and overhead of dealing with regulators. We call this “Audit Resilience.”  I spoke to a number of people that are taking a wait and see approach to GDPR compliance. Interestingly even though they are taking this approach, they are still getting requests to remove personal information. It seems to me that if you are taking a wait and see approach, you really still need to be able to remove personal information from at least the web site otherwise, you risk triggering a complaint, and then … you have no defense. Goal has to be to do everything not to trigger a complaint. The presentation took about 15 minutes, and the rest of the time was spent demonstrating the data control model in the DATUM governance platform – Information Value Management.

Also had the pleasure of presenting with Lynn Scott who co chairs the Healthcare Technology & Innovation practice at Polsinelli with Bill Tanenbaum – what we wanted to do was push home the point that collaboration is key when dealing with thorny risk and compliance issues. We tried to have some fun with this one.

I will be at the Data Architecture Summit in Chicago in October. The session will cover:

  • What are the requirements to ensure management is “audit resilient”?
  • What is a Control System and how is it related to a Data Control Model?
  • What is “regulatory alignment” from a data perspective?
  • How do I build a Data Control Model?
  • What role do advanced techniques (AI, Machine Learning) play in audit resilience?

Hope to see you all there

3stooges happy

Advertisements

Audit Resilience and the GDPR

15 May

Compliance activities for organizations are often driven from the legal or risk groups. The initial focus is on management’s position and actions required to be compliant; generally this starts with the creation of policies. This makes sense as policies are a reflection of management’s intent and provide guidance on how to put strategic thinking into action. The legal teams provide legal interpretation and direction with respect to risk. This is also incorporated into the policies. So, what happens next as your organization addresses challenges around ensuring effective implementation and subsequent operational oversight of policies required for General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) compliance?

THE CHALLENGES

The challenges associated with GDPR as well as other compliance activities are centered on achieving “Audit Resilience.” We define this as the ability to address the needs of the Auditor – internal or external – in such a way that compliance is operationally enabled and can be validated easily and with minimal disruptions and cost. The goal is to reduce the stress, the chaos and the costs that often accompany these events to a manageable level.

WHAT DOES AUDIT RESILIENCE MEAN?

Audit Resilience means that the auditor can:

  • Easily discern the clear line of site between Policies => Standards => Controls => Actors => Data.
  • Review and explicitly align governance artifacts (policies, standards and processes) to compliance requirements.
  • Access and validate the “controls” that ensure standards are applied effectively.
  • Find evidence of execution of the governance practices within the data.

 

CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS

GDPR compliance is a function of creating logical linkage and consistency across multiple functions and actors – down to the data level.  Details will vary based on the organization and the assessment of risk.

Overall, the following are critical to successfully demonstrating compliance:

  1. Produce a catalog of all impacted data
  2. Know where data is being used, and by whom
  3. Show governance lineage from Policy => Process => Standard => Control => Data
  4. Report on effectiveness of “Controls”
  5. Produce specific data related to particular requirements such as: Security Events, Notification, Privacy Impact Assessments, and so forth.
  6. Show the relationship of governance tasks to both data and the business processes that use Personal Information.
%d bloggers like this: